US Embassy warns China expats to avoid anti-Japanese protests

Things are certainly escalating in regards to anti-Japanese protests due to China’s ongoing dispute with Japan over the contested Diaoyu/Senkaku Islands. I’ve heard mention from a few people that more protests are likely planned for this weekend, and no doubt continuing after that. The following is a warning from the US Embassy for its citizens to avoid such events, as they can quickly turn violent.

In light of news of ongoing and likely further protests in China related to a territorial dispute in the East China Sea between China and Japan, the United States Embassy and Consulates General in China remind U.S. citizens that even gatherings intended to be peaceful can turn confrontational and escalate into violence. U.S. citizens are therefore urged to avoid areas of demonstrations if possible, and to exercise caution when in the vicinity of any demonstrations. U.S. citizens should stay abreast of media coverage of local events and be aware of their surroundings at all times.

A Chinese man hangs some banners with slogans that read “Defeat the Japanese devils!”, “Japanese devils return home!” while burning his Civic outside a Honda dealership in Shanghai. (photo: daemonlin via Shanghaiist)

Things are certainly escalating in regards to anti-Japanese protests due to China’s ongoing dispute with Japan over the contested Diaoyu/Senkaku Islands. I’ve heard mention from a few people that more protests are likely planned for this weekend, and no doubt continuing after that. The following is a warning from the US Embassy for its citizens to avoid such events, as they can quickly turn violent.

In light of news of ongoing and likely further protests in China related to a territorial dispute in the East China Sea between China and Japan, the United States Embassy and Consulates General in China remind U.S. citizens that even gatherings intended to be peaceful can turn confrontational and escalate into violence. U.S. citizens are therefore urged to avoid areas of demonstrations if possible, and to exercise caution when in the vicinity of any demonstrations. U.S. citizens should stay abreast of media coverage of local events and be aware of their surroundings at all times.

While most violence seems to be directed at Japan and the Japanese, if people are prepared to light their own car on fire or throw hot noodles in someone’s face, it’s not hard to imagine the same blind anger jumping racial lines and being directed at anyone or anything deemed to be hurting the feelings of the Chinese people.

More likely than not there is nothing to worry about, but it’s worth taking an extra bit of caution. This whole Diaoyu situation is a fantastically timed distraction from other strange happenings, and so is likely to escalate more before it calms.