Clarity on new visa classes from Ministry of Foreign Affairs notice

Last week the Ministry of Foreign Affairs issued a bilingual notice that spells out China’s new visa structure. Beijing-based immigration lawyer Gary Chodorow has published an article highlighting some of recent changes in the Chinese visa structure in an easy-to-read layout. The post breaks down the most common visas, explaining both what the previous law …Read More

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Avoiding squatters? You’re doing it wrong

We tend to lend a lot of letters to the discussion of using toilets in China here at Lost Laowai. We have Erika’s post delivering some truths about the Chinese lady’s room, which continues to rack up rather heated comments three years after being published; as well, we have Travis’ humourous account of the first …Read More

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Breathe easier in China with this inexpensive DIY air purifier

A PhD student and Fulbright scholar based in Beijing has a great little Tumblr blog that shows, with data, that you can skip the expensive air purifiers and make your own for about $30. This post goes through the details of how to make the air purifier, and where to buy a proper filter. The …Read More

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Beijing rolls out criminal check for foreigners seeking employment in city

Beijing-based lawyer Gary Chodorow, on his blog Law and Border, has translated an announcement from the Beijing Municipal Bureau of Human Resources and Social Security (or BMBoHRaSS for short) that states that employment license applicants will be required to submit a “certificate of no criminal conviction” from their country of residence as of July 1, 2013.Read More

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Beijing Cream in your ear with The Creamcast

Popular Beijing-based blog Beijing Cream has just released the inaugural episode of The Creamcast, a weekly podcast hosted by John Artman and The Good Doctor. The podcast’s first guest is long-time China expat Frank Yu, founder of Chinese start-up Kwestr. The format is very much unstructured and conversational, and will remind most of a typical …Read More

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Video: China 1972 — Nicholas Platt’s Home Movies

I caught a link to this video in Bill Bishop’s excellent Sinocism newsletter today. The video was published back in 2010 by the Asia Society, and shows Nicholas Platt giving a voice over description of several minutes of home movies he shot in 1972 Beijing, just after the US and China resumed diplomatic relations.Read More

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The Quest for the Holy Flat

How I ventured into the depths of the low-cost real-estate market of Beijing. And survived. “Keyi nong yi nong.” “It can be fixed a bit.” So said the real-estate agent, as she finally managed to pull the front door open — in the little courtyard, the dead leaves had accumulated into a blanket of near-geological …Read More

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Expat Advice: Having an abortion in China

I just wanted to share my story in case (like I was) there is another female expat out there looking for information on the experience of having an abortion in China. I was frantically searching the web for information on this when I found out I was pregnant here and found next to nothing, so …Read More

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Top 10 attractive cities for China expats — 2012 edition

The results of China’s annual expat survey, conducted from September to December last year, are in. More than 175,000 expats participated in the survey via both online and offline voting. The 10 cities were selected based on their performance in terms of policy and administration, as well as working and living environment for foreigners. Criteria …Read More

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The Reinvention of an Expat Trailing Spouse

In early 2003, I arrived in China burned out and disillusioned from my corporate position in a small company that had just been taken over by a large corporation. My last days there were spent watching long term managers escorted out of the building clutching paltry severance packages. I couldn’t get out of that toxic environment fast enough. With my expectations high, I gladly signed on as a trailing spouse and vowed to spend our proposed assignment sitting back and enjoying the stress-free life of a pampered housewife. Read More

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Do you know what to do when emergencies happen?

Richard Brubaker recently wrote a poignant piece at All Roads Lead to China called “When the Ambulance Doesn’t Come“, in which he talks about the recent heart-breaking story of a 3-year-old British boy in Shanghai who died from injuries sustained when a partition at a restaurant fell on him. Though the mother and restaurant owner …Read More

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On the Chinese vs. foreigner language wars

After my last post for Lost Laowai, where I expressed my annoyance with the irritating and pointless public announcements in Chinese public transport, I will now move on to another aspect of life in China which I find irritating: the tendency of the Chinese to address foreigners in English even when it would be easier …Read More

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